Yes, It Is All About Me! Listen to The Latest Cedar Fort Podcast

January 13, 2020

A few weeks ago, Cedar Fort Publishing interviewed me about my book. The podcast is now available on your favorite podcast app. If you do not have a podcast app, try Overcast or Castro. Do not want to download an app but want to listen to the podcast? Go to Cedar Fort directly and listen.

I think you will find it interesting how my book Digital Scripture Study for The Busy Latter-day Saint came to be.

Media in Gospel Library Brings the Scriptures to Life

December 27, 2019

The Gospel Library (available as a mobile app and online) has been upgraded to include three types of multimedia that you can access right alongside the scriptures. You can access images and watch videos right in the “Related Content” sidebar.

[https://lds365.com/2019/12/27/media-in-gospel-library-brings-the-scriptures-to-life/]

Coming This Week – Update

I was able to start curating sooner than expected, so starting today, October 7, 2019, there is a new page.

I will be curating pertinent technology news. The curations will cover Apple, Android, tablets, Macs, PCs, software, and more.

Each day as I read technologies latest news, if I see something that will be of help to you, I will add it to the News page.

Preserving General Conference Notes

General Conference is always an exciting time for me. In preparation, a few weeks before the conference, I set up a Study Plan in the Gospel Library and listen to all of the previous conference talks. I also start to pray to ask that my mind and heart will be open for revelation. With the start of the conference, I am ready to listen and start taking notes. I think the above scenario is common for most of you.

My question to you is, “What do you do with your notes once the conference is over?” This is an important decision. Notes are of little value unless there is a method to retrieve them, and how you store them will impact the ease to which you can retrieve the information.

The primary purpose of this article is to help those that take hand-written notes, but I am going to start by briefly mentioning other methods.

There are two ways in which notes can be taken.

Digitally Using a Keyboard

The digital method requires you to use a laptop (computer), tablet, or smartphone. The app you use to type your notes varies and comes to personal preference. A word processor, a note app, or even the Gospel Library are some of the options.

Regardless of the medium used, the retrieval of the information is accessible. Simply open the search function and enter what you are looking for.

Hand-written Notes

Using paper and pen is a powerful note-taking technique. Studies have shown information is easier to recall when we engage our hands in the note-taking process. The problem is finding specific information at a later date.

I am sure you have had the same experience that I have had in finding specific information that is stored in your hand-written notes. Pulling down from the shelf one notebook after another in search of what you are looking for is a frustrating experience.

There is an effortless way to making retrieving of information a snap, and that is to use a scanner.

I am not referring to the scanner feature in your printer. The scanning process is slow, and sending it to your computer can result in frustration at the highest level.

I am suggesting using a dedicated scanner such as the ones made by Fujitsu, or better yet, a scanning app on your smartphone or tablet.

An excellent dedicated scanner can run $150 and up. While a scanning app starts at free and is rarely over $10.

On the free side is Scannable made by Evernote and will send your scanned note directly to Evernote. For this, to work, you obviously need to have Evernote, which has a free version. Scannable can be used with Android and Apple devices.

Genius Scan is another excellent app for Apple and Android. It will create a PDF version of your hand-written notes and then send the files to a service of your choice, such as Evernote, Dropbox and etc.

There is also Scanner Pro for Apple. It will scan your notes, and like Genius Scan, send the file to a place of your choice.

Whenever I discuss using scanning apps on a smartphone, I am asked, “Why not just take a picture of the notes since you are using the camera on the phone anyway?”

Scanning apps are programmed to take great photos of documents only. Rather than taking a picture of the surface, the note is lying on and the note. Scanning apps will automatically zero-in on only the document, then proceed to add filters automatically, so the scanned document looks like it was run through a copying machine. Another benefit is the app can save the document as a PDF, JPEG, or other formats. Also, the app can make the document searchable, and that is the key benefit of using the app.

Another Hand-writing Method

There is another medium for taking hand-written notes – a tablet. A tablet, stylus, and an app for taking notes are all you need to facilitate the retrieval of information quick and easy. These apps can index your hand-writing, or if you prefer, convert your hand-written notes to text. Another benefit is sharing your notes with someone else is a simple matter of copying and pasting.

Goodnotes and Notability are two excellent apps for Apple devices. For Android, Lecture Notes, and INKredible come highly recommended. In full disclosure, I do not have an Android tablet, and so I have not been able to test the apps.

Best Practice for Pen and Paper

After the conference, using your smartphone, scan the notes, then transfer the scanned copies to Evernote as a JPEG (or PDF). Evernote will make then make the scanned copy searchable. Tag the notes “GC” for general conference. In addition, Evernote can create a link to the document which can then be pasted into the Gospel Library.

You may want to paste the link in a note linked to a scripture in the Gospel Library because the speaker made a powerful statement about that verse.

In the end, your notes will be searchable, and instead of taking hours to find a note, it will take a few seconds.

Using the Gospel Library with Voice Control and a Mouse

iOS 13
iOS 13

Coming this Fall, you will be able to interact with the Gospel Library by using your voice on your iPhone and iPad, and use a mouse with your iPad. This is a brief introduction to these two new features.

Apple announced they are creating two separate operating systems (OS) – iOS 13 for the phone, and IOS 13 for the iPad. The purpose is to address the individual needs of each device.

However, there are several features they will have in common. One of them is Voice Control. This enables you to use your device without having to touch the screen. While this will be a great benefit to those with special needs, it may prove to be a benefit to every user, and time will tell if it catches on with the general public.

Currently, iPadOS 13 is in beta, and I downloaded it to my iPad to get familiar with the new OS and to try out Voice Control with the Gospel Library, and I was very impressed.

Once I turned on Voice Control, I said, “open library” and the Gospel Library opened. Then I gave the command, “tap on bookmarks,” and my Bookmarks opened. This was followed by “tap on personal study,” and my personal study Bookmark opened.

I was also able to open and close Footnotes, Notes, Tags along with scrolling up and down

One problem I had was selecting text. I was able to choose one word but not the entire verse. At this point, I am not sure if the problem was with the beta, or I was not providing the right command.

Despite the glitch, one thing is sure, I am very excited by the possibilities Voice Control offers those with special needs, but also for the public in general.

Apple has been the leader in offering accessibility to everyone, and Voice Control becomes an powerful arrow in Apple’s quiver.

As mentioned above it will be interesting to see if the general public will make use of Voice Control. And if it does catch on will Apple make further improvements in its use.

Another new feature for the iPad is the ability to add a mouse. This feature is well hidden in the Accessibility in settings and requires that you turn on AssistiveTouch.

You can use a mouse connected by cable or wirelessly. Depending on the iPad you have if you use a mouse connected by cable you may need an adapter.

I used an Apple wireless mouse and was very pleased with the results even though it lacks a few options normally found with a mouse such has right click to bring up a sub menu.

As pointed out above the mouse capability was added to help those that have physical challenges, but this feature will be a game changer for everyone even with some of its limitations.

Voice Control and using a mouse are just two of the many new features that are coming with iOS 13 for your phone and iPadOS 13 for your iPad.

September will be an exciting month when both OS will be made available to the public.